How to Find and Hire Young Sales Champions

Chances are as you were climbing the ranks of your career path there were opportunities you sought out that were ‘above your pay grade’ or you never had the experience for.

Experience is key to how well you do in business and most importantly how likely you are to get hired by a company. Startups have basically changed the way hiring is done these days, the young talent shouldn’t be looked passed now because there’s always a chance they could be the next Startup ‘guru’.

Rather then overlooking the younger generation, you should embrace their drive, hunger and determination to succeed. Sure we live in a business world that preaches the “move fast and break things” mantra but when you move fast you make mistakes just as quickly. If you can make a mistake and learn from the consequences then you’ve potentially amassed a wealth of experience that some other people would have taken years to try and fail at.

You don’t need me to tell you that sales is the key and foundations to the success of your business so looking into the realms of sales professionals shouldn’t just be limited to the Senior’s etc.

The difference with hiring a young sales star is you need to look carefully and ensure you can align the company goals, your goals and the talent pool’s goals too.

How to Find and Hire Young Sales Champions image 425612265 ac5d948e58Workin' hard for the munnies.

Workin’ hard for the munnies. (Photo credit: jbhalper)

Here are 5 ways to do just that:

  1. Find the Talent - If you head off to a job’s fair you’ll have to compete against a vast number of other people trying to get the same talent as you are. Focus on guerilla marketing tactics to leap frog over the competition and place yourself in front of the ideal talent. One of the easiest ways to do this is encourage interactivity with your brand; giving out t-shirts is a gimmic but equip it with the right message and you’ll soon have word of mouth travelling fast.
  2. Culture - This doesn’t mean fooseball tables but instead its the culture the applicants have outside of their work life. Charity work, team sports, bands etc are all key signs to see if there is in fact a company cultural fit. One of the biggest failing points of hiring talent is that their person culture clashes with the companies culture. Add in a stubbornness to adapt and you’ve cost yourself a heap of time and money.
  3. Past Work - People claim to be ‘hungry’ and ‘motivated’ yet mention the poor job’s market as an inability to gain experience. This can be attributable for many people but with the thriving freelancing market and a large number of professionals taking on this work there is little to no room for excuses as to not even attempting it. Regardless freelance work is a great sign that the talent understands deadlines and can work on their own motivation too.
  4. Be Different – Just as much as we/you demand the talent to be different you should be too. You mention all of the perks the job offers which will either entice or push away the talent, throw in something bespoke to the talents likes and tastes to make it less generic. If you’ve create a perk that is centred to their needs, demands and desires you’ll see an instant connection between you, the talent and the company.
  5. Mentoring – Professionals, not just in sales either, become disillusioned with their roles, progress and career path when they lack feedback and guidance. Always looks to assign a key mentor into the talents life, if they’ve got the talent and willingness to learn and work then a mentor is exactly what they need. Someone who will guide them, eager sales people tend to jump into all parts of the process in a spray and pray mentality, ultimately making their efforts far more focused and effective.

Talent is something that can rarely be taught but it can be easily wasted, if you can find it within a young professional and create an environment where they learn and thrive then you’ll have the secret weapon your company needs to succeed. Far too many business owners are too hasty to looked past the young, inexperienced professionals for the senior experience, non-adaptable professionals.

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