Setting Clear Employee Expectations and 4 More Business Tips From the Week

A roundup of the best tips of the week from Entrepreneur.com.

Effective communication is a crucial skill for leaders. In the business world, a lack of clear communication with employees can damage the health of your company. "Unclear expectations lead to inefficient processes and subpar performance," says Christine Lotze, a partner at Philosophy IB, a Florham Park, N.J.-based management consulting firm.

One way to make sure that your expectations are understood is to design a work environment that supports them. "Every element of your culture must reinforce the expected behaviors you outline for your employees," Lotze says. For instance, if you value risk-taking in your employees, as Google does, then you should set up a reward system for it. And be sure your company's work processes give your staff the freedom to fail now and then. More: Getting the Best From Every Employee: Communication Techniques That Work

Encourage your website visitors to be more active.
It's frustrating when visitors to your website leave in a hurry. One of the best ways to get them to stick around is to give them something to do, says Eric Siu, a Los Angeles-based entrepreneur and internet marketer. For instance, you could point them to free multimedia content on your site, or encourage them to check out a specific post on your blog or ask for their comments. You may still need to dig deeper into your analytics to discover the root of the problem, Siu says, but these tactics will get you started. More: Easy Ways to Keep Visitors on Your Website Longer

Delegate your weaknesses to hone your strength.
In a startup's early days, a founder often has to juggle multiple roles. But you will never be able to develop expertise in one area if you're splitting your focus too much, says Matthew Thomas, co-founder and executive director of InterSector, a leadership organization promoting collaboration among business, government and nonprofit organizations. Delegate tasks in areas where you're weakest. Be willing to give up some responsibility, and your business will benefit. "Embrace your new role, and trust the people around you," says Thomas. More: How to Discover Your Superpower in Business

When drafting a prenup, be honest about what you want.
A prenuptial agreement can protect your business assets if your marriage ends. But when you're in the lovey-dovey stage, it can be hard to ask for one. "A prenup can be seen as very self-serving," says June Jacobson, a Manhattan-based lawyer, divorce mediator and licensed psychotherapist. Nevertheless, you need to be honest about why you want it and why it's important to you. "Don't blame your lawyer or family to take the pressure off yourself," Jacobson says. If your spouse-to-be understands where you're coming from, he or she will be more likely to agree. More: How to Ask Your Partner for a Prenup

Think of Twitter as a better job board.
Postings on online job boards reach only the people who are currently looking for a job. But posting a job opening to Twitter will reach people who may not be actively looking for a new job. "People who already like your company are probably following you," says Tom Gimbel, founder and chief executive of LaSalle Network, a Chicago-based recruiting agency. "Seeing your tweet may make them consider applying." More: Why Twitter Might Be Your Best Recruiting Tool

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