How to Sell Your Boring Product with Exciting Marketing

How to Sell Your Boring Product with Exciting Marketing image Lays Do Us a Flavor contestLays Do Us a Flavor contestLet’s be honest: Some products are just flat out boring. Who passionately cares about things such as insurance or windmills? I know I don’t, and even if you care about these two specific products, there are others out there that you would call boring.

However, brands that create lovable marketing plans are able to reach consumers no matter how uninteresting the product may seem. According to Lightspeed Research and the Internet Advertising Bureau, younger audiences are yearning to be entertained and engaged by online content and advertising.

3 Exciting Tips for Boring Industries

Interesting and exciting content catches the attention of consumers who would otherwise ignore your products and services. Corporate Visions has found that 37 percent of marketers believe that campaigns that neither entertain nor engage are the biggest barrier to a marketing campaign that generates leads.

Brands seeking to create exciting marketing should:

  • Remember that exciting doesn’t mean silly. One of the biggest temptations in creating interesting content is to go over the top – or be silly. This pitfall is especially hurtful for companies that are “serious” in nature such as financial firms or real estate industries. If going over the top is fitting for your brand, then go for it, but that won’t be the case for most industries. For instance, Lady Gaga is over the top and creatively brilliant in her marketing, but her style is unique to her and no other artist. Likewise, your brand’s marketing should always fit the tone of your company.
  • Think outside the blog. Exciting content to market your brand isn’t limited to the content on your blog. With social media, there are endless avenues to pump engaging and entertaining content with. Consider picture campaigns on Pinterest or captivating videos geared towards YouTube. Thinking outside the blog also allows you to reach consumers who aren’t already interested or aware of your brand.
  • Give consumers power. Lays is currently running their “Do Us A Flavor” contest where consumers can submit ideas for a new flavor that Lays will distribute nationally. While this is being branded as a contest, it also doubles as brilliant marketing, as consumers become engaged with the brand. Since voting determines the winning flavor, hundreds of thousands (if not millions) of people will not only vote, but also discuss the contest and even share the voting page on social media.

Case Studies in Creative Marketing

Many companies in “boring” industries are taking advantage of content strategies that interest and engage users. “Boring” businesses that create compelling content include:

  • General Electric. This company doesn’t naturally generate excitement as easily as it produces energy, but their Pinterest presence is impressively eye-catching. They’ve created galleries of “Badass Machines” that produce electricity efficiently and cleanly. This strategy works because the pictures pack a WOW-factor while directly relating to the mission of the company.
  • Dollar Shave Club. The Dollar Shave Club is one of the few companies that have created a commercial that people actually want to watch. The commercial is provocative and verges on the line of inappropriate, but it’s absolutely hilarious and matches the tone of the brand.
  • Dropbox. The marketing strategies at Dropbox are aimed at people’s human emotions. The simplicity of their emails and emoticons are lovely, personable designs and all of their content is easily digestible.

Remember, however, that no matter how creative your marketing gets, nothing can replace legitimately useful content. The temptation will be to focus on engaging content instead of creating content. To avoid this pitfall, plan your message and the focus of your marketing campaign. Once the message is crafted, determine the best method to propagate it in exciting ways!

What ways have you found to generate excitement and engagement?

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