Keys duplicated from digital copies stored in the cloud

While Lockitron has done away with physical keys with its smartphone-based door locking system, what if homeowners lose their phone? A new startup called KeyMe has developed a kiosk that enables anyone to cut a new copy of their house key from a digital file stored in the cloud.

Located in several 7-Eleven stores around New York City, the kiosks first require customers to place the key they want cutting into the slot, which scans it and creates a digital version. Users can either pay USD 3.49 to get a copy of the key there and then, or can choose to store the file by creating a KeyMe account with an email address and their fingerprint using the biometric scanner. If they lose their key, or suddenly find they’ve been locked out of the house, account holders can then simply head to the nearest 7-Eleven, scan their finger and cut a new key for USD 19.99. Customers can choose between a standard key and a range of novelty designs, including KeyMe’s special bottle-opening key.

The innovation could save homeowners the hassle and cost of calling out a locksmith at difficult times. As more and more tasks are able to be completed by machines, are there other emergency needs that could be met by all-hour automated kiosks such as this?

Website: www.keyme.net
Contact: www.keyme.net/faq.html

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