Great Ad Copy: How to Outsmart a Millionaire

You can learn a lot just from devouring great ad copy. The best copywriters create ads that speak directly to a specific target audience. And when you have the right audience, and the right message, you have gold.

In this post I want to share with you an ad that is absolutely brilliant. And I’ll break down why so that you can use the same methods in your ads, sales copy, posts, letters…or even conversations.

It really boils down to one point though: entering the conversation inside your prospect’s mind. Maybe not so coincidentally, that’s a topic that is covered in this month’s issue of [CSH] Premium (so click here to grab this power-packed issue while you can).

Let’s start with the ad. This is one you should ad to your swipe file.

Great Ad Copy: How to Outsmart a Millionaire image ad copyGreat Ad Copy: How to Outsmart a Millionaire

So what makes this ad so great? Let’s discuss…

Great Ad Copy Starts with the Audience

The first step of writing great copy is knowing your audience. If you do that you can beat out most of your competition without even being close to a professional level copywriter.

In this case, I pulled the ad out of a men’s lifestyle magazine. This image has been sitting on my desktop for quite sometime so I don’t remember which one it was. But that tells you the audience this was written for.

I would venture to guess the majority of the readers would love to lead a luxurious lifestyle but don’t necessarily have the means to do so.

That sets the stage for what your ad copy must address. And it all begins with the headline…

Great Ad Copy Grabs Attention

The vast majority of the people that are going to set eyes on this ad aren’t millionaires. And they never will be. But that doesn’t mean they don’t desire to feel like one…or even smarter than one.

Moreover, the assumption most people have is that millionaires are smarter than the general population.

The headlines, combines with the subheading, tells you that you can not only outsmart the millionaire-type…but you can also steal their spotlight.

These are two intangible, emotional benefits right off the bat.

Coupled with a large image that will grab some attention when flipping through a magazine, and you’ve got a great start.

Great Ad Copy Tells a Story

This ad doesn’t start talking about how great the watch is and why you should buy it.

It starts with a story. It has a protagonist (the “good guy” that bought the Stauer watch at a great price). And it has an antagonist (the “bad guy” that is rude and drops $14k on a luxury timepiece).

This “Robin Hood of Watches” allows you to be the Robin Hood in real life by putting the bad rich guy in his place.

After all…as this ad says…this “isn’t a cry for attention” (possibly like that Italian sports car is?).

Great Ad Copy Builds Value

After this ad hits on the emotional value and benefits of the purchase, it builds the value of the watch to make you feel like you should be paying $14k for it.

After all, the company invested “over $40 million on Swiss-made machinery to insure the highest quality parts.” It takes six months to make each watch. Each watch has over 200 precision parts. It’s a complex assembly. And this is why it’s limited edition.

The ad copy makes you feel like the amount they are charging you is an absolute steal compared to the amount of time, money and effort that went into making the product.

Great Ad Copy Tells You What To Do

Don’t expect people to know what to do. Make sure you tell them. And make it clear. This ad reinforces that this watch is limited edition and it tells you to order today.

And of course it tells you where to call and what promotional code to use. Chances are this promotional code is really just for tracking purposes to see how the ads are performing. Which is another thing…

Great Ad Copy Should Be Tested!

Great Ad Copy Provides Social Proof

You can display social proof in many different ways.

You can show testimonials from previous customers. You can also provide a list of major publications that you have been mentioned in.

Of course, having a celebrity in your ad provides social proof as well (that’s why celebrities get paid just to show up to places). This is the approach that Rolex takes in their ads:

Great Ad Copy: How to Outsmart a Millionaire image rolex ad copyGreat Ad Copy: How to Outsmart a Millionaire

The approach Rolex takes is actually completely different. After all…their watches “have soul.” :) . But that’s a discussion for another day…

In this case, Stauer shows the BBB seal and A+ rating.

Even if this tiny little feature of the ad increases conversion by a fraction of a percentage, that can mean a ton in terms of actual sales.

[Optional] Bonuses and Guarantees

In many cases providing guarantees for your product can boost sales. In some cases, providing bonuses is what actually convinces someone to buy…as certain people may want the bonus more than the product itself (go figure).

Now this is something that should be tested thoroughly.

Sometimes guarantees can actually hurt your conversions. Try to find a guarantee in the Rolex ad. It’s not there. They don’t need to provide a guarantee…they’re freaking Rolex. Providing a guarantee in their case cheapens the products.

Don’t let the guarantee fairy rob you and knock your daughter up…

Great Ad Copy is…Evil?

The truth is, great ad copy isn’t about reality. Especially in this case.

It’s all about emotion. It’s about getting into the head of the prospect and making them feel the benefits of buyign the watch.

Anyone that knows anything about watches, and really wants a high-quality luxury watch knows that they will never get one for under $200 (not even close). And a someone who is wearing a $14k luxury watch isn’t likely to be “left speechless” by a Stauer.

But this isn’t about the guy wearing the luxury watch…it’s about the Stauer prospect.

This taps into insecurities, jealousy, contempt, and all sorts of deep-rooted emotions.

So yes…great ad copy can be used for good and for evil. But if you have a great product that is going to add value to someone’s life, then you have an obligation to convince them to buy it.

Is making someone feel good about themselves in comparison to millionaires enough “value”? Possibly…the ad seems to be working as it has been around for quite some time.

Is the product actually worth it? Or is it a “guaranteed piece of shit” as Tommy Boy would say?

No idea…haven’t purchased Stauer. But I’m totally buying into their copywriter…because that is some mighty-fine ad copy.

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