Question

Bank Of America Check Fraud?

I recieved a cashier check from bank of america but it didnt come attached with any papers an when i call to verify it the account is valid but the cashier check isnt i just dont know what to do i mean i need the money but i dont wanna be in jail for fraud and its not my fault i dont know wat to do
i stay in mississippi so i have no bank of america near me all i can do is call and sometimes the say its valid and sometimes they dont

6 years ago - 8 answers

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Fake Check Scams
Work from Home Scam
SCENARIO: A victim answers an online email or newspaper ad or posts their resume on a popular Internet website and is then awarded a job title called something like “Payment Processing Clerk” or “Accounts Receivable Clerk.” The job description includes receiving checks on behalf of the company, depositing the checks into the victim’s personal bank account, and wiring the monies when the funds are posted to the account. The victim is instructed to keep 5% to 10% of the value of the checks as their “salary.” The victim deposits the checks and sends the money to the employer via wire or Western Union when the funds are available and posted to their bank account.


SCAM: The “employer” was a fraudster and the checks or money orders that were deposited are counterfeits. They are frequently drawn off well-known businesses or US Postal Money Orders, so they seem legitimate, but they are not.

Internet Auction/Overpayment Scheme
SCENARIO: The victim sells or auctions goods (usually high-priced items) via the Internet. The buyer sends the victim a check or money order for more than the purchase price and asks the victim to wire the excess money to a third party, often in a foreign country. The victim is informed that the excess money will be used as payment for the shipper who has been hired to pick up and ship the merchandise on the buyer’s behalf.

SCAM: The “buyer” and “shipper” were fraudsters. The check or money order that the buyer has used to purchase the goods is returned as counterfeit or stolen, and the victim has lost the money wired to the shipper. This scheme is often used when selling large items such as automobiles, motorcycles, boats, etc. The check or money order is frequently drawn off well-known businesses or US Postal Money Orders, so it seems legitimate, but it is not.

Canadian/Foreign Country Lottery Scam
SCENARIO: The victim receives an email or letter stating that they have an opportunity to receive a substantial sum of money. The letter states that the victim has won the Canadian Lottery (or some other country’s Foreign Lottery). The letter informs the victim that they must pay a processing or transfer tax or fee before receiving the money. A check or money order will be enclosed to cover the required fees, and the victim is instructed to deposit the check into their bank account and wire the money to a third party, usually in a foreign country.

SCAM: The person who contacted the victim about the “Lottery” was a fraudster, and the victim has not won any money. The checks or money orders that were deposited are counterfeits. They are frequently drawn off well-known businesses or US Postal Money Orders, so they seem legitimate, but they are not.

Foreign Business Offers/Advance Fee Scams
SCENARIO: The victim receives an email from a foreign official or businessperson who has a business proposal. The businessperson wants to move a large sum of money from a foreign country and needs assistance. The victim is usually offered 25% to 40% of the proceeds as payment for their trouble. If the victim agrees, they usually receive a large check in the mail. The victim deposits the check into their bank account and the funds are posted to their account. However, the businessperson now needs an advance fee of $30,000 to $40,000 to bribe an official, pay transfer fees or attorney fees, settle taxes, etc. The victim believes the previously deposited check was genuine, so they honor the request and wire funds to the businessperson.

SCAM: The “official” or “businessperson” was a fraudster, and the checks or money orders that were deposited are counterfeits. They are frequently drawn off well-known businesses or US Postal Money Orders, so they seem legitimate, but they are not.

Romantic Chat Room/Love Losses/Russian Bride Scheme
SCENARIO: The victim has been in an ongoing Internet relationship and is informed that funds are needed to pay for travel expenses for their Internet mate to travel to the United States and begin their life together. The victim soon receives checks or money orders and is instructed to deposit the checks or money orders into their bank account, then to transfer a portion of the funds, via a wire service, to cover their Internet mate’s expenses. The funds are posted to the account and the money is wired.

SCAM: The “Internet mate” was a fraudster, and the checks or money orders that were deposited are counterfeits. They are frequently drawn off well-known businesses or US Postal Money Orders, so they seem legitimate, but they are not.

Roommate/Rental Schemes
SCENARIO: The victim posts an on-line or newspaper ad looking for a roommate or to sublet an apartment, condo, house, etc. The victim enters into an agreement with a new roommate and receives a check covering the first and last month’s rent, utilities, security deposit, etc. Shortly after the check or money order is deposited by the victim, the new roommate contacts the victim with a tragic personal tale and informs them they will not be able to rent the property. They are requesting a refund of a portion of the money they sent, minus a fee for the victim’s time and trouble. The money is wired back to the fraudster.

SCAM: The “new roommate” was a fraudster, and the checks or money orders that were deposited are counterfeits. They are frequently drawn off well-known businesses or US Postal Money Orders, so they seem legitimate, but they are not.

Nanny Scams
SCENARIO: A wealthy family registers at a nanny-matching website looking for a nanny. They are willing to pay an excellent wage in exchange for child-care duties, and to attract a prospective nanny, they are willing to advance a generous amount of money in the form of a check or money order. The victim signs up, but then the wealthy family immediately says that they mistakenly sent too much money and requests that the remaining balance of the advance be returned via Western Union or other electronic means. The victim sends the requested money back.

SCAM: The “wealthy family” was a fraudster. The key here is, because the fraudsters ask for the money back immediately, the original payment hasn't cleared the bank yet. The checks or money orders that were deposited are counterfeits. They are frequently drawn off well-known businesses or US Postal Money Orders, so they seem legitimate, but they are not.

Inheritance Scam
SCENARIO: The victim receives notification from an authoritative source such as a law firm, an executor of a will, or a barrister, notifying the victim of an inheritance from a long-lost relative or friend. The official has the victim provide their bank account number for funds to be deposited into their account, on the agreement that a fee must be made. The official may then do 1 of 2 things:

1. Tell the victim how much the fee is and request that it be sent via Western Union or other electronic means. The victim sends the requested fee.

2. Send the victim their inheritance as a check or money order, but then immediately say that they mistakenly sent too much money and request that the remaining balance of the advance be returned via Western Union or other electronic means. The consumer sends the requested money back.

SCAM: 1. The “lawyer” is a fraudster who cannot help with any inheritance. The fraudster keeps the fee that the consumer has sent.

2. The key here is, because the fraudsters ask for the money back immediately, the original payment hasn't cleared the bank yet. The checks or money orders that were deposited are counterfeits. They are frequently drawn off well-known businesses or US Postal Money Orders, so they seem legitimate, but they are not.

Charity Scam
SCENARIO: The victim wants to help charities such as those for the victims of natural disasters like Hurricane Katrina and the 2004 Sumatran Tsunami, so they sign up online to help out. Through a series of emails, the victim is hired to be the “middleman” or “broker” to receive donations into a new bank account they are told to open. The job description includes receiving checks, depositing the checks into their newly opened bank account, and wiring the monies when the funds are posted to the account. The victim is instructed to keep a certain percentage of the value of the checks as their “salary.” The victim deposits the checks and sends the money via wire or Western Union to the charity when the funds are available and posted to their bank account.

SCAM: The “charity” was fraudulent. And the funds sent to the newly opened bank account and then on to the charity belong to fraud victims’ from other banks, who may have had their identities stolen or responded to a phishing email on the Internet. The victim not only has received and kept fraudulent funds, but has also forwarded a portion of those funds on to the fraudster.

How to Protect Yourself

Be cautious of any offer that sounds to good to be true.
Verify any calls or emails that you receive about a security or fraud investigation with your bank or financial institution.
Be wary of any offer that requires you to wire money, withdraw cash from your account, or provide account information.
Review the FBI Fraud Alert signs of a scam
Review The Alliance For Consumer Fraud Awareness website
Other Check Fraud Security Tips

Store your checks, deposit slips, bank statements, and cancelled checks in a secure and locked location. Never leave your checkbook in your vehicle or in the open.
Unless needed for tax purposes, destroy old cancelled checks, account statements, deposited checks, ATM receipts, etc.
Reconcile your bank statements within 30 days to detect any irregularities.
Never give your account number to people you do not know, especially over the telephone to unsolicited phone sales calls. Please note that Bank of America will NOT send out email asking you to verify personal data.
When you receive a new or replacement check order, make sure all the checks are there and that none are missing.
Mail your bills from the Post Office or sign up for On Line Bill Pay.
Limit the amount of personal information on your check. For example, do not include your Social Security Number or Driver’s License Number on your check.
Visit our website to learn about types of online fraud
Bank of America is committed to educating our customers on check and deposit fraud schemes and protecting them through our Privacy and Security content.

Source(s):

6 years ago

Other Answers

mail it to me, I'll find somewhere to cash it

by BDOGG - 6 years ago

If you are serious, why in the world would you even consider cashing a check that you got out of the blue. This is a very common SCAM. If you cash it you know it will come back as bad and you will owe the money back.

As long as you DO NOT cash it you are fine. If you want you can turn it into your local law enforcement or Bank of America.

by OC1999 - 6 years ago

if Bank of America says the check isn't valid, it won't cash anywhere.

Likely, this is part of a scam of some sort -- send phoney check to someone who'll deposit it and then send 90% of the amount on to someone else.

the check comes back as forged [which it is] and YOU are stuck repaying the entire amount to your bank. Note that this could come back several weeks or months later.

Send no one any money. If you're in email contact with someone over this -- thank them for the check and tell them they'll never get a cent out of it. Then put their email address on your "banned" list.

Source(s)

by Spock (rhp) - 6 years ago

Just to make sure I would take the check to the nearest Bank of Amerca branch and ask them in person if the the check is good or not. If it is a bad check then who ever gave you the check needs to make good and give you a good check. If they won't do that then you should report them to the police, because it is a crime to give someone a bad check. If it is alot of money you could file suit againt them, but it is probably not worth the effort unless it is a lot of money.

If it is just a check you got out of the blue and not from someone who owed you money then you should just tear it up and forget about it.

by Just Me - 6 years ago

You need to contact with the bank for an account number.

by James S55$$ where I give you ME. - 6 years ago

Sounds like a scam, but take it to BOA and ask them if it’s valid.

by Stacy - 6 years ago

I am a victim too...

I have lost money. Right now, I didn't know if I can get money back......

I hope I can get the substitute check.........

by suadiaaa - 6 years ago