The Anatomy of an Online Purchase

I’m pretty sure the last time I bought jeans for only $20, I was in middle school, my mom was paying, and they had to be worn with one of these. Yes, it’s been a while, so I was cautiously jubilant when I came across 20Jeans.com recently. Cool clothes for only a Jackson? Could it be?

The most effective online marketers are operating at a level substantially more strategic than simply trying to drive purchases in the short term. They are looking to build lifetime relationships based on elegant customer experiences across all touchpoints. I decided to chronicle this process as I experienced it with 20Jeans. In each step, you’ll see an incrementally narrowing definition of “me” as defined by historical and real-time data, followed by suggestions for how marketers can take action by leveraging that data to add value to my shopping experience.

Off-Site Messaging

The Anatomy of an Online Purchase image 20Jeans Facebook adThe Anatomy of an Online Purchase Everyone has seen “buy our cheap stuff!” messaging before; what hooked me in this particular Facebook Ad’s case was not the price point, but the word “addiction.” This was clearly not your average “cheap stuff” retailer, but a website that could become a part of my clothes-buying routine. You’ve caught my eye, purple cow.

Know Me: A young professional guy in his 20s browsing Facebook.

Take Action: Know your brand, what type of customer you’re looking to attract, and craft compelling messaging that resonates.

On-Site Messaging

Would there be a bait and switch? In this case, no. 20Jeans clearly reiterated the messaging I saw off-site—it sells cool clothes for $20 or less that I would actually wear. Touché 20Jeans, I will now explore you more.

The Anatomy of an Online Purchase image 20Jeans landing page 620x428The Anatomy of an Online Purchase

Know Me: A young professional guy in his 20s, who is a first-time visitor, on his first page, who arrived via a specific Facebook ad.

Take Action: This step is key! You are spending money to drive visitors to your site via various channels; don’t confuse them by forgetting to clearly reaffirm the promise you made to them off-site. If they saw a certain promotion, restate it, and be sure to link to relevant products or categories.

Third-Party Validation

It is important to clearly understand the psychographics of your customer when crafting your on-site experience. For example, in 20Jeans’ case: My dad buys $20 jeans; I do not want to dress like my dad.

Know Me: A young professional guy in his 20s, who is a first-time visitor, on his first page, who arrived via a specific Facebook ad.

Take Action: 20Jeans prominently calls out the fact that it’s been featured in Maxim, AskMen, and Thrillist—third parties that I know curate content for guys in my age group and socioeconomic status. This goes a long way in encouraging me to continue browsing. Are there third parties your ideal customer trusts? For new visitors—or repeat visitors who have never purchased—consider ways to call out that your brand is popular and trusted among “people like you.”

Mastering Big Data: Best Practices, Dos & Don’ts
Big data offers big opportunities for marketers, enabling them to deliver the most relevant website experiences possible to visitors. But there are hurdles to overcome. Find out how to avoid big data missteps and stay on the path to success. Download your free copy today.

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